Market News

Winter Market Holiday Guide - 2017 Edition

 

Each December, VFM staff round up our top picks from the Winter Markets to help make your local holiday gift giving and entertaining a breeze.

Craft spirits, artisanal cheeses, deluxe baked goods, seasonal wreaths and bouquets, specialty food items, and fine craft are just a few of the hundreds of festive ideas on hand at Nat Bailey & Hastings Park Winter Markets this month. So break out those December to do lists and start thinking local for the holidays…


Shiny & New

 

Photo: Kasama Chocolate

Bean-to-bar Kasama Chocolate produces a range of artisanal bars and truffles that boast some of the nicest packaging around. Their Spirits of BC truffle collection is top gift pick for Anna Bock, our Assistant Operations Manager. “They’re made with BC craft spirits,” explains Anna Bock, our Assistant Operations Manager. “a great gift for someone you don’t know well, but want to show your appreciation for.”

Kasama Chocolate will be at Nat Bailey on December 16.

 

Also look for: buttery English Toffee from Blackberry Hill.

 

Photo: Sons of Vancouver

Sons of Vancouver Distillery make small batch, barrel aged amarettos that carry notes of apricot, juniper, orange peel, and creamed honey. “They’re so unique,” says Christa Wood, VFM’s office coordinator. “We’ll be using them in my husband’s signature Dark n’ Stormies this Christmas.”

Sons of Vancouver will be at Hastings Park on December 10.

 

Also look for: a bottle of the newly released Salal Gin from Odd Society Spirits.

 

Photo: Elephant Garden Creamery

The holiday season is a time to relax and let inhibitions go out the window. Ice cream in our morning coffee? Yes, please! Why not try some of the yummy seasonal offerings from Elephant Garden Creamery, like White Choco Christmas and Mont Blanc (it’s made with chestnuts, people!)

Find Elephant Garden at Hastings Park on December 10 & 17

 

Also look for: handmade ice cream in flavours like Caramel Ribbons and Costa Rican Vanilla from Take a Fancy Sweets & Chocolate.

 

Photo: BCB Honey Farm

BCB Honey keep close to 60 million bees in production in British Columbia each year. Their pink ginger honey is the gift of choice this season for our Hastings Park Manager Gabrielle Vacheresse. “I recently bought a jar as a gift to myself,” says Vacheresse. “It’s really yummy on a crusty piece of sourdough toast or in lemon tea.”

BCB Honey will be at Hastings Park on December 10.

 

 

Also look for:  A jar of the Vancouver Special Honey from Six Legs Good Apiary, produced from their urban hives.

 

Photo: Rocky Creek Winery

The folks from Rocky Creek Winery in Cowichan Valley, BC produce a great line of red and white wines along with special selections like sparkling, and rosé. Their Wild Blackberry has become their signature, great on it’s own as a rich, port-style wine or mixed into your holiday cocktails.

Find Rocky Creek at Nat Bailey on December 9.

 

 

Also look for: the Sparking Finch, a blend of chardonnay and pinot noir from Robin Ridge Winery.

 

Photo: Le Bouledogue

“I don’t like to play favourites, but they make one of the best blondies around,” says Trout Lake Manager Jordan Mehl of Le Bouledogue, one of VFM’s newest bakeries. “I’d definitely lay a plate of them out at your next holiday party.” Along with amazing sweet baked goods, Le Bouledogue also makes a line of specialty jams in flavours like Blueberry Basil.

Find Le Bouledogue at Hastings Park on December 10.

 

Also look for: sourdough breads, pastries, and crackers from lakehouse foods.

 

Photo: Drunken Chocolatier

Drunken Chocolatier, who debuted December 3rd at Hastings Park Winter Market, is a top pick this season for Jess Landing, VFM community engagement coordinator. “Their chocolates are incredibly beautiful – they look like paintings, ” says Landing. “Their going to make really great stocking stuffers”.

Catch Drunken Chocolatier at Hastings Park on December 10.

 

 

Also look for: limited edition Mulled Wine Chocolates from Coconama.

 

Photo: Doan’s Craft Brewing Co.

Doan’s Craft Brewing Co. is one of VFM’s newest breweries, and we think you should check out their BC grown rye based brews like the Rye Porter and house series Little R & R (with rice and rye). With its distinctive illustrated branding, any of their bottles of cans would look great under your tree with a little red bow.

Doan’s will be at Nat Bailey on December 9 and Hastings Park on December 17.

 

Also look for: the Holiday Gift Set from Persephone Brewing Co., containing a beer glass, toque, and two bottles of beer.

 

Photo: Spruce Goose Chop n’ Block

Spruce Goose Chop n’ Block is a brand new vendor at the Winter Markets this season that is bringing some truly exceptional salami to the people of Vancouver. “Any combination of their charcuterie would be a great addition to a holiday platter,” says VFM Operations Manager, Laura Smit. “Especially the porcini salami.”

Find Spruce Goose at Hastings Park on December 10.

 

Also look for: some grass-fed beef pepperoni from Greendale Meats.

 

Photo: Barrelhouse Brine

Got a cocktail lover on your list? Put a bottle of Barrelhouse’s Sourback Cocktail Brine in their stocking – perfect for sour caesars and pickletinis.

Barrelhouse Brine will be at Nat Bailey on December 16.

 

Also look for: Boozewitch Chili Lime Shrub from Gillespie’s Fine Spirits.


Tried & True

 

Photo: Nancy Esworthy Designs

“Nancy’s designs are classic – her jewellery is the kind of gift you buy for someone else, but end up keeping for yourself.” says Jen Candela, VFM’s Communication Manager, of Nancy Esworthy Designs. Incorporating unusual materials like deer antler and mammoth ivory mixed with precious metals, wood, and leather, Nancy pieces have a tribal elegance that will please even the most discerning jewellery lover.

Find Nancy Esworthy at Nat Bailey on December 9.

 

Also look for: hand forged sterling silver jewellery featuring luminous stones and freshwater pearls from Ildiko Jewelry.

 

Photo: von Hardenberg Candles

“I love the beeswax pyramid candle from von Hardenberg,” says Nat Bailey Manager Randy Elliott. “All of their candles are quality, but that one is such a unique shape for gifting.” Von Hardenberg makes a wide selection of 100% Canadian-sourced beeswax candles, including specialty 5″ tapers that can be used on Christmas trees or for Hanukkah menorahs.

Find von Hardenberg Candles at Nat Bailey on December 16.

 

Also look for:  Valley Gold Bee Co.‘s selection of candles and tealights made of beeswax from their own hives.

 

The Hive Printing is a Vancouver-based print shop that produces a range of dry goods like t-shirts, tote bags, and tea towels. “My husband loves a unique t-shirt so I always pick up one of the new designs from The Hive,” says Roberta LaQuaglia, VFM Direct Manager. “I particularly like the ones based on local streets and maps.”

The Hive Printing will be at Hasting Park on December 17 and Nat Bailey on December 23.

Also look for: Vancouver Farmers Market branded tees, printed on Bella + Canvas unisex jersey t-shirts and available at the Market Info Tent.

 

Photo: Ambercott Acres

The dried fruits mixes and fruit leathers from Ambercott Acres are a stocking stuffer must. Made from organic fruit grown on their orchards in Cawston, BC, these sugar free fruit leathers come in 10 different flavours like nectarine-apple and pear-apricot.

Find Ambercott Acres at Nat Bailey on December 16 & 23.

 

Also look for: Klippers Organics Crispy Apple Chips.

 

Photo: Vancouver Farmers Markets

Don Asperin creates wood objects that are as beautiful as they are useful. His maple cutting boards, wooden boxes, and small home accents make lasting and practical gifts.

Don Asperin Woodworks will be at Nat Bailey on December 9 & 23.

 

Also look for: screen-printed wood coasters and wall hangings from The Hive Printing.

 

Photo: Vancouver Farmers Markets

The most versatile gift you could buy for a market lover, VFM Market Money never expires and is accepted at all of our locations. Market Money gift certificates in $20 amounts can be purchased at our weekly Nat Bailey and Hastings Park Winter Markets – bundle one with an annual Market Membership for $40, and we’ll throw in a gift Market Tote Bag.

 

 


Holiday Eats

 

Photo: JoJo Das

The candied and smoked salmon sticks from Blue Comet Seafoods are a big favourite of VFM Executive Director, Tara McDonald. “They look beautiful on a platter, and nothing says “West Coast Christmas” like smoked salmon,” she says. Along with plenty of smoked options, Blue Comet’s canned salmon makes for pretty great stocking stuffers.

Find Blue Comet Seafoods at Nat Bailey on December 9, 16, & 23 and Hastings Park on December 10 & 17.

 

Also look for: delicious canned smoked tuna from Estevan Tuna.

 

Photo: JoJo Das

Pâté Pastiche creates vegan and gluten-free pâtés in knock out combinations like golden squash and sage, market herb, and forest mushroom. A great alternative to traditional meat-based spreads, these wholesome pâtés are sure to please vegans and non-vegans alike.

Pâté Pastiche will be at Nat Bailey on December 23.

 

 

Also look for: Savoury Duck Pâté from Chef Enrick

 

Photo: Blackberry Hill

If you’re looking for traditional holiday baking to impress your guests, make sure to check out Blackberry Hill Bakery at Nat Bailey Winter Market this month. They make everything from mince pies to shortbread, Christmas cakes to rum balls – all you have to do is plate it up for your holiday table.

Blackberry Hill will be at Nat Bailey on December 9, 16 & 23.

 

 

Also look for: traditional German stollen from Sweet Thea Cakes.

 

Photo: JoJo Das

Dundarave Olive Co. brines, marinates, and stuffs their olives by hand. Incorporating ingredients like manchego  cheese, dried apricots, and anchovies, their olive mixes are unique and delicious – a must for your holiday party platter.

Find Dundarave Olive Co. at Nat Bailey on December 16 & 23.

 

Also look for: classic pickled beets from Anne’s Preserves.

 

Photo: BobAli

BobAli’s hummus, tapenades, and dips make for a colourful and tasty addition to festive celebrations. Standouts for VFM staff include the Sweet Potato & Chipotle Hummus, and their Beet & Horseradish Tapenade.

Find BobAli at Nat Bailey on December 16 and Hastings Park on December 17.

 

Also look for: Tempea vegan tempeh pâté.

 

Photo: JoJo Das

Lighten up on all those rich, holiday foods with a selection of seasonal fruits and veggies from the Winter Markets. Kiwis are in season, there are still some grapes available, and of course, all of those great storage apples will be around throughout the winter. Check out our In Season page and start planning your holiday grocery lists!

 

 

Looking for a particular product or vendor? Find them with our Product Search Tool.

The Winter Markets are open for the holidays on the following dates:

Nat Bailey: December 9, 16, and 23       Hastings Park: December 10, 17.

Join us December 23 for a special holiday addition of Nat Bailey Winter Market, featuring visits with Santa, live carolling, kids crafts, and more!

 


Fall cooking & nutrition tips to keep you nourished this season

 

Our friends at Canadian School of Natural Nutrition know a lot about good, healthy food. They run a number of classes and food skills workshops across the year at their Vancouver campus – everything from probiotic foods & beverages to knife & kitchen skills to raw food fundamentals. We asked CSNN’s marketing coordinator Lynne Faires, RHN to share some of her top tips for staying nourished this fall and winter, plus her recipe for a quick and easy Roasted Squash & Apple Soup

Fall Cooking & Nutrition Tips

by Lynne Faires, RHN

Summer months mean more cooling foods such as fresh fruits, greens and herbs that we enjoy raw with grilled goodies cooked on the outdoor BBQ. Fall and winter make it less appealing to step outside and grill up a fancy dinner. However, that doesn’t mean that you must be without a hearty, warm meal that is exciting!

Rainbow chard from Forstbauer Family Farm

Know what’s in season in Vancouver

We are so fortunate to live in a climate where food can be grown almost all year round! Before you go shopping at your local farmers market, know what’s in season by checking out the list on their homepage. Plan a few recipes that include in-season foods before heading out the door.

Cooking methods

The BBQ has been decommissioned for the next six months and that means that the slow cooker is in! The slow cooker (or crockpot) is my favourite way of cooking for many reasons, but mostly because it is quick and simple to use.

Find ginger and turmeric from Shalefield Organics at Nat Bailey Winter Market

Prep the meal the night before and keep it in your fridge overnight. Pop it on to cook when you leave for work and when you arrive home, you have dinner ready! One-pan roasted meals are also great for a quick and easy meal, that warms up the house at the same time.

Warming Herbs and Spices

Herbs and spices not only warm you up, but have many therapeutic health benefits as well. Find recipes that include warming herbs and spices such as black pepper, ginger, cayenne, cinnamon, garlic, cardamom and horseradish to keep you toasty in the colder months.

Root vegetables abound at the markets in the winter months

Root Vegetables

Root vegetables are available all year round, but are at their peak from fall to spring. They are great to add to soups, stews or roast in the oven to go with your meal as a side dish. Beets, carrots, potatoes, rutabaga, parsnips, turnips, onions, and garlic all have their own nutritional benefits. Together root vegetables are packed full of fibre, vitamin A & C, potassium, and magnesium. They also offer a variety of anti-oxidants and help regulate blood sugar as they are high in complex carbohydrates.

Fresh Sockeye Salmon from Blue Comet Seafood

Vitamin D

As the days get shorter, so does our exposure to sunlight. We get much of our vitamin D from sunlight or from foods that have been enriched with synthetic versions. Vitamin D is known to help prevent and support brain, muscle, nerve and brain health disorders. At the market you can find a few whole foods that are naturally high in vitamin D. Eggs, fish (salmon, tuna, sardines) and mushrooms are all great sources.

Serve Hearty Meals

Eating fresh foods during the summer is great, but after a rainy day in Vancouver, you and your family most likely will be craving a warm, dense meal. Heat up home-made broth with a variety of root vegetables (carrots, potatoes, squash, rutabaga, onion) for a delicious, quick meal. Add in your choice of meat for a heartier version.

Freezing leftovers

Busy lifestyles make it hard to cook every day. Make things easier on yourself by doubling up on your favorite soup, chili, or stew dish and freeze portions for later.

 

Easy Roasted Squash & Apple Soup

Ingredients

  • 1 medium butternut squash or two smaller squashes such as pumpkin, acorn or kabocha
  • 1 medium onion cut in half- skin on
  • 1 apple cut in half and seeds removed
  • 1 can full fat coconut milk
  • Optional flavours- add 1 Tbsp curry powder OR add 3-4 leaves of fresh or dried sage
  • 1 liter of water or bone broth
  • Sea salt to taste

Directions

  • Preheat oven to 350F
  • Place halved squash on baking sheet cut-side down, with the apple tucked into the hollowed out ‘bell’ where the seeds were. Place onion halves on baking sheet as well
  • Roast squash for about 45 min or until it is soft. For hard-shelled squash you need to test the fleshy side to see if it is soft
  • Take out of the oven and flip the squash to cut side up to cool
  • Once cool enough to handle, scoop the flesh into the blender with the halved onion and optional flavours and coconut milk, adding just enough water to blend to desired consistency
  • Season with sea salt to taste
  • To store, pour into 1 liter jars and refrigerate or freeze (leaving 2” head-space if freezing)
  • To serve, garnish with cilantro, fresh cheese, grated apple or fried sage leaves

Fall Vendor Update: cheese, mead, & sweet treats at Hastings Park

 

We’re not sure if it’s the idyllic, tree-lined location or the exciting roster of new vendors on board this season, but we can’t wait for the 3rd season of our Hastings Park Winter Market to open on November 5th.

Along with weekly appearances from popular farm vendors like Klippers Organics, Stein Mt. Farm, Golden WestCrisp Organics, and Cropthorn Farm, some new growers to Hastings Park this season include Abundant Acre Family Farm, Salt & HarrowIce Cap Organics, and Snowy Mt. Organics.

Popular Agassiz-based organic dairy The Farm House Natural Cheeses will also be adding dates at Hastings Park this year, along with a weekly spot from Golden Ears Cheesecrafters, who produce a range of grass-fed cheeses and butter.

Ex-Bourbon Sherry Wood Single Malt Barreled No.82 Amaretto from Sons of Vancouver (photo credit).

Vancouver’s only meadery, Humblebee Mead are bringing their unique blend of honey-based libations to the market throughout the winter season. They’ll be joined by Sons of Vancouver Distillery, makers of small batch vodka and amaretto, and award-winning Vancouver Island winery Rocky Creek, who produce a selection of reds, whites, and bubblies.

New food carts at Hastings Park this season include yummy eats from Mandalay Burmese Kitchen, who serve up South Asian/Burmese favourites, and Beiju Foods, Vancouver’s first Brazilian food truck bringing savoury, gluten-free options to the market.

Photo credit: Elephant Garden Creamery

For something on the sweeter side, don’t miss Hella Puffs (Greek-style dessert dumplings), and Elephant Garden Creamery, whose collection of handcrafted ice creams include flavours like Vietnamese coffee, genmaicha matcha, and salted gula melaka (palm sugar).

To fuel your market shop, grab a quality brew from the folks at Kafka’s Coffee on Main St. who will be popping up at the market in their bright blue truck every other week starting January 7th.

 

Other Hastings Park newbies to look out for this season include yummy baked goods vendor Le Bouledogue; gluten free and paleo friendly offerings from Virtue Natural Bakery; handcrafted ferments from lakehouse foods, natural and nutritious baby food options from Tiny Tummies; a selection of microgreens and sprouts from Nutrigreens, and November appearances from The Sharing Farm, BC’s only non-profit farm that grows food for the Food Bank and community meal programs.

Hastings Park Winter Market runs Sundays, 10am-2pm from November 5 – April 29 (closed Dec 24 & 31) at the PNE. There is free parking for market shoppers at Gate 2 off of Renfrew Street. More info on dates/times, location, and vendors schedules on the Hastings Park page.


In Season: Bone broth for optimal health

 

Starting to feel autumn’s chill creeping into your bones? Warm up and get healthy with this week’s In Season post on bone broth, that age-old staple of traditional diets that is both nutrient-dense and deeply hydrating. The following nutritional info and recipes come from one-time VFM vendor Andrea Potter, who teaches a wide range of whole foods cooking classes both privately and at the Vancouver campus of Canadian School of Natural Nutrition.

 

Empire Valley’s cattle are free range and grass fed. Find them next at Trout Lake Market on Oct 21 and Kitsilano Market Oct 22

Bone Broth

by Andrea Potter, RHN

Our ancestors were thrifty; they knew how to utilize every single part of the animal. They were also wise; bone stocks provide dense nutrition which is easily digested, the perfect food for children, the elderly, the sick, and for those of us who just live on the real world, and who need good food to fuel and heal ourselves in our busy lives.

Nutrition and Therapeutic Benefits of Bone Broth

+ Gelatin (made of collagen) from joint bones like knuckles, back vertebrae and feet, is a digestive aid. The gelatin in bone stock is a hydrophilic colloid. It is one of the only cooked foods that attracts digestive enzymes by attracting and holding water, including digestive juices. This is also why bone broth is deeply hydrating.

+ Collagen in bone broths is powerful in building new connective tissue and skin. Therefore, it is especially helpful in healing from surgery, healing injuries, benefits athletes, pregnant people, growing children and even improves the suppleness of the skin and improves hair growth.

+ Bone broths contain the minerals of the bone, cartilage and marrow, as well as the nutrients from the vegetables and the benefits of the herbs that they are cooked with.

+ Bone marrow is around 96% fat and contains myeloid and lymphoid stem cells. Within the animal, these cells create red and white blood cells and build immunity. Valued as a prized food source in many traditional populations, bone marrow was thought to nourish children and pregnant women. More studies are underway with renewed interest in eating the ‘odd bits’ and what their nutritional benefits are.

Here’s what you will need:

A stock pot –a 2 quart (8 liter) dutch oven or heavy-bottomed pot is great. If you are interested in making a large quantity and freezing it, use a 20 liter pot. The larger the pot of course, the pricier they get. If your budget does not allow for a commercial heavy-bottomed stainless steel 20 liter stock pot, buy a big pot with a thinner bottom and a heat diffuser.

Roasting pan– the kind you put a turkey or chicken in is good. Any oven-proof vessel with sides is fine. Even a baking (cookie) sheet works.

Strainer – the idea is to get the chunks out, so a colander works. The finer the sieve or strainer, the clearer your stock will be. I have worked at restaurants who filtered bone broth through a coffee filter- three times for clarity. This may be excessive for the home cook, as there are no nutritional benefits to clearer bone broth. The usual kitchen stuff such as oven mitts or towels, chopping board and sharp knife, containers to strain the stock into…

Brown Stock Method for Beef, Lamb, or Venison

All recipes by Andrea Potter, RHN

Ingredients

  • 5 lb bones of beef, veal, lamb, venison…
  • 3 onions, large dice
  • Optional: 1 leek, washed and large dice. Green part is ok.
  • About 6 medium carrots, large dice
  • Celery, 6 stocks
  • 1 4-6 inch piece kombu seaweed
  • 1 can tomato paste, or about 6 halves sun-dried tomatoes, or a couple of fresh tomatoes
  • Thyme, rosemary, bay leaf and peppercorns 

Directions

  • It is best to have the butcher cut the bones from big animals. Otherwise you will be missing out on much of the flavour of the marrow within them. This also makes them easier to handle. Marrow bones have the most nutrition, but a few rib bones with meat still on them adds flavour too.
  • Place the bones and veggies in a roasting pan and brown in the oven at about 375 F (190 C) or higher. This may take over an hour. Drizzling a little oil on them helps keep them from burning and sticking.
  • Once they are brown, place them in a stock pot and more than cover the bones and veggies with cold water and add your spices, seaweed and herbs. Put on the heat and bring to a simmer. This will produce some scum. (The white-ish stuff that comes to the top.) Skim the scum with a ladle.
  • Drain the fat from the roasting pan. ( This step is actually optional, and just for a clear stock. The fat always rises to the top when it cools, so if you are cooling it, just skip this step and add the fat to the pot).
  • Those brown bits on the bottom are full of flavour. In fact, the French have a word for this. They call it ‘fond’, meaning foundation. De-glaze the pan using water, wine or vinegar. Add this to the stock pot or slow cooker.
  • I like to cook my beef stock for 12-24 hours. I let it sit on the burner on very low overnight, covering it with a lid will ensure that it does not boil dry. (Don’t forget to crack a window in the house.)
  • Strain the stock through a sieve or colander. Cool the stock by putting the bucket of stock into a sink full of ice OR by placing it by a cool window on a cooling rack. Once cooled, refrigerate. The fat will come to the top and harden. Keeping the fat undisturbed while cooling allows the stock to last much longer in the fridge or to freeze without freezer burn. (This keeps in the fridge for 5 days or so.)
  • Freeze it in 1 liter containers for convenience. If you don’t have much room in the freezer, put the stock back into the pot and boil it down until it reaches a thick consistency. This is called demi glaze or demi glace. It is the base for all meat-based reduction sauces. You can add a few spoonful’s of this beef jelly to a soup made with water, and it’s basically the same as using regular-strength stock.

Chicken Stock

Ingredients

  • 1 chicken carcass from roasting or a couple of packages of bones.
  • 2 onions
  • 2 carrots
  • 1 leek (cleaned well), optional
  • 3 stocks celery
  • 1 bulb fennel(opt)
  • 1 bulb garlic, cut in half width-wise
  • A couple inch piece of kombu seaweed
  • Either ¼ cup egg-shell vinegar (see side note) OR 1 lemon, cut in half
  • thyme, bay leaf and black peppercorns

Directions

  • Chop up all of the veggies big and chunky. In a roasting pan, drizzle the vegetables with oil and ‘toss’ them up to coat.
  • Add the chicken carcass/bones to the veggies.
  • Roast in the oven at 350F for 45 minutes or until it smells great and the veggies are a bit golden in colour.
  • Then transfer them into a big pot and put your herbs and spices in. Add water until vegetables are submersed and water is about halfway up the pot. (About 3.5 liters)
  • Then simmer for 4-8 hours and strain.
  • Let liquid cool, then put into freezable 1 liter container and label with the date.
  • See, that was easy!

Looking for bones from grass fed, free range animals for your broth? Vancouver Farmers Markets has a wide variety of ranchers and producers on our roster. Empire Valley Beef, Vale Farms, and Greendale Meats are great sources for beef, and Goldwing, K & M Farms, and Lamington Heritage Farm are all good choices for chicken and poultry. More info on vendors and products on our product search page.


This Week's Recipe: Healing Bone Broths with Andrea Potter, RHN

This week’s In Season recipe for healing bone broth come from local registered holistic nutritionist and chef, Andrea Potter. Read on for her recipe for both beef and chicken stock, and for more in-depth info on the nutritional benefits of bone broths, make sure to check out Andrea’s guest post on our Market News blog!

Brown Stock Method for Beef, Lamb, or Venison

All recipes by Andrea Potter, RHN

Ingredients

  • 5 lb bones of beef, veal, lamb, venison…
  • 3 onions, large dice
  • Optional: 1 leek, washed and large dice. Green part is ok.
  • About 6 medium carrots, large dice
  • Celery, 6 stocks
  • 1 4-6 inch piece kombu seaweed
  • 1 can tomato paste, or about 6 halves sun-dried tomatoes, or a couple of fresh tomatoes
  • Thyme, rosemary, bay leaf and peppercorns 

Directions

  • It is best to have the butcher cut the bones from big animals. Otherwise you will be missing out on much of the flavour of the marrow within them. This also makes them easier to handle. Marrow bones have the most nutrition, but a few rib bones with meat still on them adds flavour too.
  • Place the bones and veggies in a roasting pan and brown in the oven at about 375 F (190 C) or higher. This may take over an hour. Drizzling a little oil on them helps keep them from burning and sticking.
  • Once they are brown, place them in a stock pot and more than cover the bones and veggies with cold water and add your spices, seaweed and herbs. Put on the heat and bring to a simmer. This will produce some scum. (The white-ish stuff that comes to the top.) Skim the scum with a ladle.
  • Drain the fat from the roasting pan. ( This step is actually optional, and just for a clear stock. The fat always rises to the top when it cools, so if you are cooling it, just skip this step and add the fat to the pot).
  • Those brown bits on the bottom are full of flavour. In fact, the French have a word for this. They call it ‘fond’, meaning foundation. De-glaze the pan using water, wine or vinegar. Add this to the stock pot or slow cooker.
  • I like to cook my beef stock for 12-24 hours. I let it sit on the burner on very low overnight, covering it with a lid will ensure that it does not boil dry. (Don’t forget to crack a window in the house.)
  • Strain the stock through a sieve or colander. Cool the stock by putting the bucket of stock into a sink full of ice OR by placing it by a cool window on a cooling rack. Once cooled, refrigerate. The fat will come to the top and harden. Keeping the fat undisturbed while cooling allows the stock to last much longer in the fridge or to freeze without freezer burn. (This keeps in the fridge for 5 days or so.)
  • Freeze it in 1 liter containers for convenience. If you don’t have much room in the freezer, put the stock back into the pot and boil it down until it reaches a thick consistency. This is called demi glaze or demi glace. It is the base for all meat-based reduction sauces. You can add a few spoonful’s of this beef jelly to a soup made with water, and it’s basically the same as using regular-strength stock.

Chicken Stock

Ingredients

  • 1 chicken carcass from roasting or a couple of packages of bones.
  • 2 onions
  • 2 carrots
  • 1 leek (cleaned well), optional
  • 3 stocks celery
  • 1 bulb fennel(opt)
  • 1 bulb garlic, cut in half width-wise
  • A couple inch piece of kombu seaweed
  • Either ¼ cup egg-shell vinegar (see side note) OR 1 lemon, cut in half
  • thyme, bay leaf and black peppercorns

Directions

  • Chop up all of the veggies big and chunky. In a roasting pan, drizzle the vegetables with oil and ‘toss’ them up to coat.
  • Add the chicken carcass/bones to the veggies.
  • Roast in the oven at 350F for 45 minutes or until it smells great and the veggies are a bit golden in colour.
  • Then transfer them into a big pot and put your herbs and spices in. Add water until vegetables are submersed and water is about halfway up the pot. (About 3.5 liters)
  • Then simmer for 4-8 hours and strain.
  • Let liquid cool, then put into freezable 1 liter container and label with the date.
  • See, that was easy!

Looking for bones from grass fed, free range animals for your broth? Vancouver Farmers Markets has a wide variety of ranchers and producers on our roster. Empire Valley BeefVale Farms, and Greendale Meats are great sources for beef, and GoldwingK & M Farms, and Lamington Heritage Farm are all good choices for chicken and poultry. More info on vendors and products on our product search page.