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This Week’s Recipe: Healing Bone Broths with Andrea Potter, RHN

This week’s In Season recipe for healing bone broth come from local registered holistic nutritionist and chef, Andrea Potter. Read on for her recipe for both beef and chicken stock, and for more in-depth info on the nutritional benefits of bone broths, make sure to check out Andrea’s guest post on our Market News blog!

Brown Stock Method for Beef, Lamb, or Venison

All recipes by Andrea Potter, RHN

Ingredients

  • 5 lb bones of beef, veal, lamb, venison…
  • 3 onions, large dice
  • Optional: 1 leek, washed and large dice. Green part is ok.
  • About 6 medium carrots, large dice
  • Celery, 6 stocks
  • 1 4-6 inch piece kombu seaweed
  • 1 can tomato paste, or about 6 halves sun-dried tomatoes, or a couple of fresh tomatoes
  • Thyme, rosemary, bay leaf and peppercorns 

Directions

  • It is best to have the butcher cut the bones from big animals. Otherwise you will be missing out on much of the flavour of the marrow within them. This also makes them easier to handle. Marrow bones have the most nutrition, but a few rib bones with meat still on them adds flavour too.
  • Place the bones and veggies in a roasting pan and brown in the oven at about 375 F (190 C) or higher. This may take over an hour. Drizzling a little oil on them helps keep them from burning and sticking.
  • Once they are brown, place them in a stock pot and more than cover the bones and veggies with cold water and add your spices, seaweed and herbs. Put on the heat and bring to a simmer. This will produce some scum. (The white-ish stuff that comes to the top.) Skim the scum with a ladle.
  • Drain the fat from the roasting pan. ( This step is actually optional, and just for a clear stock. The fat always rises to the top when it cools, so if you are cooling it, just skip this step and add the fat to the pot).
  • Those brown bits on the bottom are full of flavour. In fact, the French have a word for this. They call it ‘fond’, meaning foundation. De-glaze the pan using water, wine or vinegar. Add this to the stock pot or slow cooker.
  • I like to cook my beef stock for 12-24 hours. I let it sit on the burner on very low overnight, covering it with a lid will ensure that it does not boil dry. (Don’t forget to crack a window in the house.)
  • Strain the stock through a sieve or colander. Cool the stock by putting the bucket of stock into a sink full of ice OR by placing it by a cool window on a cooling rack. Once cooled, refrigerate. The fat will come to the top and harden. Keeping the fat undisturbed while cooling allows the stock to last much longer in the fridge or to freeze without freezer burn. (This keeps in the fridge for 5 days or so.)
  • Freeze it in 1 liter containers for convenience. If you don’t have much room in the freezer, put the stock back into the pot and boil it down until it reaches a thick consistency. This is called demi glaze or demi glace. It is the base for all meat-based reduction sauces. You can add a few spoonful’s of this beef jelly to a soup made with water, and it’s basically the same as using regular-strength stock.

Chicken Stock

Ingredients

  • 1 chicken carcass from roasting or a couple of packages of bones.
  • 2 onions
  • 2 carrots
  • 1 leek (cleaned well), optional
  • 3 stocks celery
  • 1 bulb fennel(opt)
  • 1 bulb garlic, cut in half width-wise
  • A couple inch piece of kombu seaweed
  • Either ¼ cup egg-shell vinegar (see side note) OR 1 lemon, cut in half
  • thyme, bay leaf and black peppercorns

Directions

  • Chop up all of the veggies big and chunky. In a roasting pan, drizzle the vegetables with oil and ‘toss’ them up to coat.
  • Add the chicken carcass/bones to the veggies.
  • Roast in the oven at 350F for 45 minutes or until it smells great and the veggies are a bit golden in colour.
  • Then transfer them into a big pot and put your herbs and spices in. Add water until vegetables are submersed and water is about halfway up the pot. (About 3.5 liters)
  • Then simmer for 4-8 hours and strain.
  • Let liquid cool, then put into freezable 1 liter container and label with the date.
  • See, that was easy!

Looking for bones from grass fed, free range animals for your broth? Vancouver Farmers Markets has a wide variety of ranchers and producers on our roster. Empire Valley BeefVale Farms, and Greendale Meats are great sources for beef, and GoldwingK & M Farms, and Lamington Heritage Farm are all good choices for chicken and poultry. More info on vendors and products on our product search page.